I suggest you ...

11,161 votes
Vote
Sign in
Check!
(thinking…)
Reset
or sign in with
  • facebook
  • google
    Password icon
    I agree to the terms of service
    Signed in as (Sign out)
    You have left! (?) (thinking…)
    Anonymous shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Dr. Mihai Bush, PhD (MPV)Dr. Mihai Bush, PhD (MPV) shared a merged idea: Make Visual Basic 6 as a part of Windows (by default)  ·   · 
    Anonymous shared a merged idea: Please bring back Visual Basic 6.0 !  ·   · 
    Anonymous shared a merged idea: The silent majority of VB6 users did not ask VB.NET  ·   · 
    MaryMary shared a merged idea: Merge the core of VB6 into Office or the Windows OS.  ·   · 
    BravoBravo shared a merged idea: Bring back Classic Visual Basic, an improved version of VB6  ·   · 
    HMan2828HMan2828 shared a merged idea: Make a new Classic Visual Basic, an improved version of VB6  ·   · 
    Ana-Maria (VB6 software programmer)Ana-Maria (VB6 software programmer) shared a merged idea: Bring back Classic Visual Basic 6.X, an improved version of Visual Basic 6.0  ·   · 
    Anonymous shared a merged idea: Bring back Classic Visual Basic 6.X, an improved version of Visual Basic 6.0  ·   · 
    Marius OrionMarius Orion shared a merged idea: Bring back Classic Visual Basic, an improved version of Visual Basic 6.0  ·   · 
    PacManiPacMani shared a merged idea: Close the suggestion to "bring back VB6"  ·   · 
    VB6 FireVB6 Fire shared a merged idea: Bring back Classic Visual Basic, an improved version of Visual Basic 6.0 (the old idea has been stoped at 7400 votes for no good reason)  ·   · 
    MeredithMeredith shared a merged idea: Make VB6 Free  ·   · 
    Mike PaulickMike Paulick shared a merged idea: Bring back VB6. I have no interest in .net. VB6 is better for me.  ·   · 
    David KayeDavid Kaye shared a merged idea: Bring back VB 6.0! It's an extremely handy language used on tons of business apps.  ·   · 
    Adam SpeightAdam Speight shared a merged idea: Don't do a Classic VB (VB6). Open Source the VB6 compiler source code.  ·   · 
    VB6 FireVB6 Fire shared a merged idea: Bring back our un-killable cockroach, is ours !  ·   · 
    Nitesh PatelNitesh Patel shared a merged idea: The Old classic visual basic 6.0 bring it back  ·   · 
    I_A_WI_A_W shared a merged idea: Visual Basic 6.0: A giant more powerful than ever  ·   · 
    Anonymous shared a merged idea: Full vb6 Compatiablity, dammit  ·   · 
    your nameyour name shared a merged idea: shove .net up your boss's butt. bring me VB6-A already.  ·   · 
    Anonymous shared a merged idea: Open Source VB 6  ·   · 
    leoleo shared a merged idea: make it easier. In VB6 i don't have to know what classes are. It has been to complicated for simple programms.  ·   · 
    declined  ·  Visual Studio TeamAdminVisual Studio Team (Product Team, Microsoft) responded  · 

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    4474 comments

    Sign in
    Check!
    (thinking…)
    Reset
    or sign in with
    • facebook
    • google
      Password icon
      I agree to the terms of service
      Signed in as (Sign out)
      Submitting...
      • PriteshPritesh commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I see the Microsoft support statement for VB6 programming says-

        "The Visual Basic team is committed to “It Just Works” compatibility for Visual Basic 6.0 applications on the following supported Windows operating systems: Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 including R2, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

        The Visual Basic team’s goal is that Visual Basic 6.0 applications continue to run on supported Windows versions. As detailed in this document, the core Visual Basic 6.0 runtime will be supported for the full lifetime of supported Windows versions"

        This takes support for VB6 to 2023.

        It is good that this is expected to be extended when Windows 10 is launched.

        I was thinking I had to move my VB6 programs to Java. Now I don't need to. This is v. good. Thank you Microsoft.

        It looks like VB6 programming will go on forever !

      • PriteshPritesh commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Classic VB6 Programming

        I agree this post-

        " 'Please bring back VB6, do it for the people that are more into RAD than they are into zammeling anything that moves for the sake of catching up to Java or Android.'

        Well said, there are far too many posts here from those who see programming as an end in itself.
        It isn't, it is merely a method of achieving the desired result. Who needs complex, high maintenance software ? The aim of any software development tool is to make development quick and easy - that is exactly what the VB6 programming language offered.
        In the last 15 years Microsoft have lost their way.

        We shall all see, in the next few years, whether Microsoft reverse their long decline. Windows 10 looks like being a good start, but much much more is needed."

      • PriteshPritesh commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I see the Microsoft support statement for VB6 programming says-

        "The Visual Basic team is committed to “It Just Works” compatibility for Visual Basic 6.0 applications on the following supported Windows operating systems: Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 including R2, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1.

        The Visual Basic team’s goal is that Visual Basic 6.0 applications continue to run on supported Windows versions. As detailed in this document, the core Visual Basic 6.0 runtime will be supported for the full lifetime of supported Windows versions"

        This takes support for VB6 to 2023.

        It is good that this is expected to be extended when Windows 10 is launched.

        I was thinking I had to move my VB6 programs to Java. Now I don't need to. This is v. good. Thank you Microsoft.

        It looks like VB6 programming will go on forever !

      • PriteshPritesh commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        ">>The Microsoft support statement for the VB6 programming language on Windows up to and including Windows 8.1 is here...

        >> https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708.aspx

        >>This shows that Microsoft is committed to “It Just Works” compatibility for Visual Basic 6.0 applications until 2024.

        >>This is expected to be extended when Windows 10 is launched.

        That is good news, thanks for posting it.

        Now Microsoft must make a VB6 download available."

        I did not know this, thank you for posting.
        There is no reason now to migrate legacy VB6, it will be supported many years.

      • PriteshPritesh commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        It is clear Microsoft are moving away from .Net. C# and Vb.Net are outdated languages now and have never been able to compete with Java.

        Visual Studio may remain as an IDE/editor for non-Microsoft languages such as Python and JavaScript.

        Developers using C# or Vb.Net, they are only useful for desktop development (which is a dying market) and for servers (where no one uses Microsoft now). These developers need to move on to more relevant languages.

        These developers stuck with .Net shall have no future.

      • Zagor TenayZagor Tenay commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Masters of the NET Universe

        24 people contributed only 2620$ in a month.

        I was expecting much more than that to be honest. It must be a huge disappointment for VB6sters for sure. Well, another lesson. Only the strongest survive. Adapt and live or die and get extinct.

      • Zagor TenayZagor Tenay commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Suzan Whitby

        hi Suzan. Thanks for posting the article "Arrested Development: VB6 Now and Forever "https://visualstudiomag. It really shows what I have always suspected of those VB6sters. They are bunch of office boys/girls who can only use toys like excel, access or vb6. NET is for real programmers and VB6 is for kids. Before NET, VB6 was OK, because there was nothing else. However since NET came along, our world (the world of real professionals) changed for the good. We don't need to use this toy VB6 anymore. I, myself did convert all my legacy code (200k LOC) to NET years ago. It took me a few moths but I never looked back to VB6 again. I don't understand why those people commenting here still insist using VB6? However the article you have posted shows that there are more ignorant fools around than not. I just laugh at them every day. Thanks again posting this fantastic article, it thought me a lot.

      • MathScienceAndGraphicsMathScienceAndGraphics commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Suzan Whitby

        You're a funny girl... not much brain nor knowledge about anything as your writings are a proof of... but funny.

        I will not waste a quartz beat on arguing with you, as argumenting with self-granted superior people like you is futile... as in not-productive. So I'll leave you with a word from.. no, no, not Confucius nor your MS-God, but from Merriam Webster where indoctrinate is defined as : to teach (someone) to fully accept the ideas, opinions, and beliefs of a particular group and to not consider other ideas, opinions, and beliefs. MS is doing a great job on gullible minds such as yours, so it seems that, contrary to my opinion, MS is winning some battles after all.

      • Classic VB6 ProgrammingClassic VB6 Programming commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        "In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so."

        Yes, VB6 was and is awesome. That is why Microsoft should update and support VB6 programming.

      • Classic VB6 ProgrammingClassic VB6 Programming commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        As Microsoft say...

        "VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. "

        "VB6 made developers incredibly productive" - yes it did, that itself is a reason for VB6 programming to continue.

      • Support VB6 programmingSupport VB6 programming commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >>Masters of the NET Universe commented · May 27, 2015

        >>Zagor Tenay says·

        @Zagor Tenay , stop reposting your own posts. Just because you are using a different logon doesn't mean these aren't duplicates.

        Posting duplicate posts is not good forum etiquette.

        Having duplicate usernames is not permitted.

        Please desist now.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Yet more spam Zagor Tenay ?

        Under your Anonymous, Suzan Whitby, Masters of the NET Universe ,trollspotter, WPF is the Future, and Pepe Bronco logons.

        You are a sad, sad loser.

        What do your classmates think of you ?

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Now Zagor Tenay/WPF is the Future/Pepe Bronco/Marius Orion has stopped complimenting herself on her own posts. Now she just reposts them as 'Anonymous'...

        >>Fantastic article and link. I fully agree. (WPF is the Future to Zagor Tenay)

        >>Thumbs up for such a wonderful analysis. I totally agree (Pepe Bronco to Zagor Tenay)

        >>Thanks Zagor for posting those links. (WPF is the Future to Zagor Tenay)

        >>I agree 100% with Zagor Tenay. WPF rocks! (Marius Orion to Zagor Tenay)

        And what does Zagor Tenay say ? >> No my friend. I assure you that those people have nothing to do with me and I am not any of them. You are free to believe or not.

        Guess what Zagor Tenay/WPF is the Future/Pepe Bronco/Marius Orion ?
        No one here believes you.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        100 million and one reasons to hate VB and VBScript

        VB is wordy, slow, single platform, visually and syntactically unappealing, and its use exposes too many vulnerabilities in the Windows OS. Torvald's statement about it not being a great language is an understatement but more politically pleasing than my total disdain for it. I believe that Microsoft should standardize on C# for heavy lifting and PowerShell for Windows automation tasks. VB, in my opininon, no longer fits into either category.

        To summarize: VB is bad. It should go away. Stop using it.

        http://www.zdnet.com/article/100-million-and-one-reasons-to-hate-vb-and-vbscript/

      • Masters of the NET UniverseMasters of the NET Universe commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Zagor Tenay says·

        To me creation of a tool like VB6 was a very good lesson for the programming community and taught the programming world a good lesson that nobody should produce anything such as VB6 in the future. The reasons may be listed as follows:
        1- VB6 was a "patch-up" tool from the beginning. The VB6 developers at Microsoft were trying to make everybody happy by adding patches here and there, sometimes quite in unorthodox ways. There has never been a top to bottom approach from the beginning. The big picture of the forest was never there. When someone wanted something new, they were planting some more exotic trees into that forest which become slowly but surely an uncontrollable ecosystem, namely a jungle. When they have created VB6, it was that moment, I believe, that things start getting out of control. There were so many unorthodox, unconventional hacks into the heart of windows APIs, that the VB ecosystem started cracking and the collapse would have been imminent, if it had continued as VB7,8,9 ETC...
        2-The other factor that the VB ecosystem was doomed to fail sooner or later, was the fact that the entire windows structure was exposed to programmers through API hooks in dangerous ways. It was an unmanaged way of reaching to the heart of windows which could only worsen the entire operating system. There were OCX and third party vendors, which have mushroomed almost overnight,quite uncontrollable and able to do all kind of hacks without giving any thought about the consequences. Big companies producing important, mission critical code and informed programmers with vision could see that VB6 was sinking in it's own weight. Maintainability, expandability, creating standard coding practices was impossible. It was a dead end. That's why they were more than willing to jump on the managed ecosystem that we call NET today.
        So in short, it was a huge necessity to get rid of a flawed tool called VB ecosystem and design something properly engineered, which would live a long and healthy life.

      • Masters of the NET UniverseMasters of the NET Universe commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Grant Swinger says

        Years ago I read an interesting interview with Bill Storage (remember him?) in Visual Basic Programmers Journal. Last night I found it again at http://classicvb.net/vfred/archives/VBPJ-StorageInterview.pdf.

        The really interesting part is about a focus group mostly made up of large-industry players. Microsoft was talking to them about future versions of VB. These guys were heavy users of VB6 and had large code bases in it. You'd think they would scream bloody murder about *any* change that broke backwards compatibility, right? Well, they didn't. In fact, they wanted a clean break with the past. From the interview:

        ----------------------------------------------------------
        BS: I have an interesting story about the first focus group conducted for VB7, perhaps
        two years ago. We were in a room, a group of us from the industry. I want to make it
        clear that it was a focus group, and that Microsoft was looking for our feedback—we
        weren’t there to help develop the product.
        The goal at that time was to make VB7 backward-compatible; that is, even the forms
        were to be backward-compatible. Yuval Neeman came into the group and said, “Guys,
        this is looking a lot harder than we thought, so we’re thinking of having two
        compatibility options: non-compatible and kind-of compatible.” Then he stated all the
        issues associated with this and asked us what we thought.

        After some discussion, I got up on my soapbox and suggested, “Drop backward
        compatibility altogether. Do us a favor; haven’t you guys learned the lesson of DOS?
        Backward compatibility cost us so much money over the years. Break my code. Force me
        into getting rid of my old code if I want to add VB7 features into my product. But this
        means that you’ve got to make VB6 usable for the next five years alongside VB7
        because, if I want to fix a bug, I’ve got to be able to open the old version and fix it. I
        cannot do that right now. VB6, VB5, and VB4 are incompatible.”

        Yuval asked, “What do you guys think of this? Agree with Bill? Disagree?”
        I was expecting a huge fight from the other people in the focus group. However, all but
        one person said they agreed. We had a discussion for about half an hour, then the last guy
        said that he more or less agreed.

        Then we broke for lunch, and afterward Yuval came in and said, “Do you guys realize
        what you’re telling us? I mean, we’re flabbergasted. We can’t believe what we’re
        hearing.”
        We kicked it around for another hour, then we said, “Yeah. This really is the right
        thing to do, from the perspective of those of us who have very large code bases.”
        --------------------------------------------

        So this is why VB7 (aka VB.NET) turned out the way it did. The people that count -- the ones Microsoft listens to -- wanted a clean break. They didn't want what you guys have been asking for.

        As I said before, if the big dogs wanted VB6 back would have been back long ago. It would have never gone away in the first place. This is why it's not coming back and Microsoft isn't listening to you.

        If you're going to be in this business then you have to deal with change. I was an ace Z80 and 6502 developer once. What's that skill worth now? What are my skills in MS-DOS application development worth these days? How about all the time I spent learning OS/2 development? I had to let go of the old tools, adapt and move on. It's better to do that than to spend your time tilting at windmills.

      • Masters of the NET UniverseMasters of the NET Universe commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Suzan Whitby says

        @MathScienceAndGraphics

        I guess you have no idea about modern programming concepts, modular design, OOP, SOLID. Because, if you were a "real" programmer developing LOB code,you would immediately understand that it is impossible to use those concepts with VB6. The big business needs complex, but reliable, maintainable, expandable, testable mission critical software and Microsoft and others are there to listen to the needs of the big guys, not the ones like you who produces 1$ worth of shareware toy programs. That's why they will NOT listen to you even if you come here everyday, begging them to bring back VB6. It simply won't happen. Period! Judging from your name, if you are in research or science, just use Python and Matlab, like 99.9% of researchers. It is easy to learn for non programmers like you. There is a considerable community out there. VB6 is even bot good for scientific community anymore. It is not maintained, very much open to hacker exploitations, very unstable in modern windows (unless you still use XP). So, please, either learn something new or keep on using your dinosaur VB6 code, until it eventually collapses on you. But don't come here and please don't try to lecture others like a smart a.ss.

      ← Previous 1 3 4 5 223 224

      Feedback and Knowledge Base