I suggest you ...

Bring back Classic Visual Basic, an improved version of VB6

The silent majority of VB6 users did not ask for changes that came with .NET

We request Microsoft brings back classic Visual Basic as COM development is back with Windows 8.

David Platt wrote an excellent article about why classic VB still thrives:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj133828.aspx

7,433 votes
Vote
Sign in
Check!
(thinking…)
Reset
or sign in with
  • facebook
  • google
    Password icon
    I agree to the terms of service
    Signed in as (Sign out)
    You have left! (?) (thinking…)
    Anonymous shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    MeredithMeredith shared a merged idea: Make VB6 Free  ·   · 
    Mike PaulickMike Paulick shared a merged idea: Bring back VB6. I have no interest in .net. VB6 is better for me.  ·   · 
    David KayeDavid Kaye shared a merged idea: Bring back VB 6.0! It's an extremely handy language used on tons of business apps.  ·   · 
    Adam SpeightAdam Speight shared a merged idea: Don't do a Classic VB (VB6). Open Source the VB6 compiler source code.  ·   · 
    VB6 FireVB6 Fire shared a merged idea: Bring back our un-killable cockroach, is ours !  ·   · 
    I_A_WI_A_W shared a merged idea: Visual Basic 6.0: A giant more powerful than ever  ·   · 
    Anonymous shared a merged idea: Open Source VB 6  ·   · 
    declined  ·  Visual Studio teamAdminVisual Studio team (Product Team, Microsoft) responded  · 

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    1381 comments

    Sign in
    Check!
    (thinking…)
    Reset
    or sign in with
    • facebook
    • google
      Password icon
      I agree to the terms of service
      Signed in as (Sign out)
      Submitting...
      • FrancisFrancis commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Guys, In my country DR Congo (Kinshasa), I completed my University degree in 2008, but I can ensure you we still using Visual Basic 6, and our teachers still teaching it till today, and even plenty universities around my country still using it.

        What haven't I done with Visual Basic 6 ! I've done almost everything !!!

        I develop in Qt/ C++, C, Html, PHP, ASM, but VB 6 is simple to use and fast to build project !!!

        Visual Basic 6 is my Baby, I do like it so much !!!

        We're waiting forward to see Visual Basic 7, OOP included with thread management !!!

      • FrancisFrancis commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Guys, In my country DR Congo (Kinshasa), I completed my University degree in 2008, but I can ensure you we still using Visual Basic 6, and our teachers still teaching it till today, and even plenty universities around my country still using it.

        What haven't I done with Visual Basic 6 ! I've done almost everything !!!

        I develop in Qt/ C++, C, Html, PHP, ASM, but VB 6 is simple to use and fast to build project !!!

        Visual Basic 6 is my Baby, I do like it so much !!!

        We wait forward to see Visual Basic 7, OOP included with Thread management !!!

      • septianypseptianyp commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        even newbie like me love vb 6 than vb .net, if i want study for future, i just want to skip vb .net and aiming for c#, but it seem in TIOBE, VB 6 was popular than c#, i believe vb 6 have more future if many hacker show their talent to bombard Microsoft itself, or when Microsoft make vb 6 as open source, it more dangerous option for Microsoft because they will killed by their own primitive weapon

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I also love Visual Basic 6 und I would cry tears of joy for a new VB 7 version. We are developing business software, using VB 6 and some 3rd-party components. This Developmentsytem fits our needs perfectly. I took a look at the NET.ide, but its so big, so busted, and one important thing Microsoft doesn't consider, we need our time do develop our software, not to learn something new we don't really need.

        To my mind a new compact, modern and fast VB 7 would be a great success, even for Microsoft. I know a lot of developers , still writing modern software with VB 6. They would fall down to their knees for a new version most-liked ide.

        Come on, Microsoft ...
        Greetings from Ecki

      • SuperDreSuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Anonymous: but what's the use of using .NET if you're not gonna use the full framework.. When I use VB6 I use everything that's possible to use, and any advanced stuff to get it running fast (and I also try to use as less third party components (and even then I try to restrict myself to using components for which the sourcecode is availabel), and the rest I write myself)..
        But when I use .NET I try NOT! to use the Visual Basic library, but use the .NET standard, so porting the code to C# from vb.net makes it much easier (and with the latest version of VS you can just copy VB.NET code and paste it as C# (and viceversa)..
        But as Winston says, I wonder what keywords you ARE using and what you aren't...

        I want a VB7 (the one they already have but never finished) as it will propably give me even more control and speed..

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Here is a thought for some of you geniuses...

        Just as you can write full windows applications using standard C++ code inside Visual Studio without resulting to MFC or using code\keywords\templates specifically designed for Microsoft's brand of Visual C++, you could have also done the same with Visual Basic or the last 20 years. The very programs I began writing in Visual Basic 5.0 back in 1997, I have ported to VB6 and now to VB .NET witho almost zero change in code. How was I able to do this? Because I used only standard Visual Basic laguage and avoided using any keywords or functions that were specific to any version. As well, I also avoided using any third party controls, or any specialty control releases from Microsoft that were not a part of of Visual Basics original packaging. When I needed a control that was not standard, I wrote my own, using only the standard Visual Basic language and keywords, those which still have not changed since Visual Basic 5.

        Take this code for instance:

        Dim intCount As Integer
        Dim objResult As New System.Text.StringBuilder(256)

        intCount = GetPrivateProfileString(Section, Key, CStr([Default]), objResult, objResult.Capacity, FilePath)

        What person in their half-way sane mind would ever be stupid enough to use the .NET version of "Dim objResult As New System.Text.StringBuilder(256)" when you could use the standard language implementation of "Dim strResult As String = Space(256)"which is applicable in any version of Visual Basic.

        intCount = GetPrivateProfileString(Section, Key, CStr([Default]), strResult, objResult.Capacity, FilePath)

        And what idiot would be asanine enough to use .NET's built in 'Char.IsNumber(cVal)' method, permenantly chaining them to .NET, rather than creating their own library uncluding a custom 'IsNumeric(strVal)' function written in standard VB? From the horrible code I've seen the last few years, apparently a whole lot of people.

        If you crybabies would have just used your brains back when creating your VB6 code by sticking with the standards rather than playing with all the shiny bells and whistlles that MS added to each successive version, you wouldn't be having this issue and crying for Microsoft to bring back VB6. I'm still using my original VB5\6 code, and I am still writing new VB6 style code... inside VB .NET, and 64-bit at that, because I used my brain back then.

        Stop buying new cars for the bells and whistles, then wondering where all your money is going after it breaks down and you have to repair all those fancy toys just to get it to work. Buy a standard car that gets you from point A to point B, that you won't have to worry about residual maintenance costs. The same with programming languages applies: whether using Assembly, C, C++, or Visual Basic, stick with only the standard aspects and controls of the languge and ignore all the frills and seemingly neat new functions that the distributor throws in, but are specific to only that version or that brand of the language. As you whiners are now finding out, not doing so costs you in the end. It's your own fault.

      • jimekusjimekus commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Microsoft can't open source code that they no longer have and only a discovery process can prove that some or all of the VB6 IDE source code hasn't been lost. They also certainly would not want code breaking NSA backdoors being made public. Just two more reasons for going the legal route to flush out the reality behind their inane excuses. I for one would donate a few hundred to such a legal fighting fund.

      • SuperDreSuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Oh mcoder14 get f-ing real man, the only real coders are those that make a living of writing their code and it doesn't matter in which language it is.. And you're nothing but a dumb crybaby who can't code for **** if he needs .NET to write 'fantastic' code.. I can write fantastic code (and **** code) in any language, VB6 or C# with it's ****** .net (**** even MS is dumping a .NET based OS and stuff like silverlight). If the next versions of windows is incompatible with VB6, it will only mean that a lot of businesses won't upgrade to VB6.. But then again, we won't have to worry about that until a windows around 2021-2024 (if Windows is still around by that time) as MS will support the VB6 runtime up until then (and propably beyond that if it's still needed)..

        And I have noticed that only a few and the same people writing here over and over again, demanding the demise of VB6... I wonder if those office clows have anything else to do other than crying. Rest of the real coders resume with their life and create code with any fantastic language including VB6 and making money with it..... A real coder can do more than .NET, and a real coder knows the importance of other languages and isn't as close minded as the a-hole you are mcoder14 (which I still believe is your actual age, and with that you're excused, you don't know any better as you have never actually worked for a living with writing code)..

      • mcoder14mcoder14 commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I have noticed that only a few and the same people writing here over and over again, demanding VB6 back. I wonder if those office clowns have anything else to do other than crying. Rest of the real coders resume with their life and create code with fantastic .Net. Thanks Microsoft giving us the best tools for real programming. We will be even more happy if you make next versions of Windows incompatible with VB6, so that this crying finally stops.

      • SeanSean commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        While Paul makes a number of great points, and ultimately he may be right that VB6 has no viable path to remaining relevant. So why not open-source VB6 and find out? Open sourcing just means you're allowing the community to fork off of the main project, giving talented developers from different quarters of the development universe an opportunity to add whatever feature(s) their imaginations can devise. If Paul is right, it will be obvious after a time that development resources spent on VB6, none of which would be Microsoft's, is a waste. So why not open source it and find out? I think the reason why they don't do it is because they're afraid that the avid VB6 community is actually right about the matter. They want to migrate you guys off of VB6 whether you like it or not.

        I wish Microsoft was more generous with and sensitive to their development community.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I Still love and Use vb6.0 and I hate and do not want to use .net. I tried to build an application using vb.net. I become too bulky in size and it also required .net framework to be installed in machines. This seems waste of time. I have created many application and deployed it across the world. It is working fantastic. No issue at all. Why should i need any other development tool such as .net. I would not like to migrate it . Because migration job is self creation of issues in working application. I hate .net and now my new development all going in Java web based platform.

      • anonymousanonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >> These people had 950,000 lines of VB6 code. It took 3 programmers 9 months to migrate at a cost of 750,000 euros (about $1 million US).

        People really. Is it any wonder why VB6 thrives on. Customers dont want to pay for this unless they have to. Also, why migrate to another platform that will be killed too. Far better Return On Investment (ROI) to migrate your app to C, COBOL, Pascal or any open source it seems.

      • Sten2005Sten2005 commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @McZ July 15,2014 and Jun 26,2014

        "Remember, it was an exact 1:1 rewrite. No "tools" beyond two pair of eyes, 20 sheets of paper and TFS were used. There where some OSS libraries and code-snippets used......."
        "A 160k+ LOC app we converted in 2011 took five weeks and two persons. It shrinked to 50k+ LOC...."

        A fascinating post, thank you for making it. There a few detailed accounts of migration from the VB6 (Visual Basic) programming language. Here is another one:-

        http://www.microsoft.com/casestudies/Case_Study_Detail.aspx?casestudyid=4000006181

        These people had 950,000 lines of VB6 code. It took 3 programmers 9 months to migrate at a cost of 750,000 euros (about $1 million US).
        They considered this to be much less than buying a third party application.

      ← Previous 1 3 4 5 69 70

      Feedback and Knowledge Base