I suggest you ...

Bring back Classic Visual Basic, an improved version of VB6

The silent majority of VB6 users did not ask for changes that came with .NET

We request Microsoft brings back classic Visual Basic as COM development is back with Windows 8.

David Platt wrote an excellent article about why classic VB still thrives:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj133828.aspx

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    Anonymous shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    784 comments

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      • harryharry commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I think they just got carried away with Java craze of the time, and must not have been basic developers on their own. Plus they had the j# code base sitting there not allowed to use because of lawsuit. I can see they say fine we will do it better! The idea of multidevice portable source is attractive but I don't think anyone has found just the right balance yet. Also they failed to realize that a healthy ecosystem has different niches, and that there new baby didn't account for existing needs without a shoehorn. Asking people who were (are) extremely productive to relearn thier ABCs at your whim while offering no benefit... Well e know how that goes

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Jonathan West: "Too much pride at stake."

        Too much pride at stake if one listens to its customers? What do you lose if you do not listen to your customers? Maybe it is not pride but simply arrogance.

      • mim tinsaymim tinsay commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        hey guys i need your help! how can i print a file using a printer object? i already assigned pr as printer object. and changed its colormode and other stuff but now im stuck. whats the code for printing a file? btw, im using vb6. please help. i've been up for 29 hours already. i need to finish this now!!!!! :( please kind people... please help me... :(

      • SuperDreSuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @anomyous: just uncheck 'align controls to grid' in the options, then you have your grid AND pixel perfect adjustment.. I have my grid set to 30/30.. And I don't understand what 'Size to Widest' is different as from just selecting the controls and then select the one you which everything to resize to (with the various resize/move buttons in the toolbar).
        (BUT with Windows 7 (and vista and I guess 8)) resizing/moving a lot of standard VB6 controls really can be slow, so slow, you can even get a cup of coffee).

        But that's the beauty of VB6, everybody uses it completely different.

      • Admin of my CastleAdmin of my Castle commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Today BASIC is in a severe shortage. Visual Studio team will waste a few more years on the useless VB.NET and after that a smarter Visual Studio team will bring back Visual Basic 6.0.

        I do not understand how the Visual Studio team can be so blind! Like they intentionally sabotage Microsoft ! For now, Visual Studio team spends money on VB.NET without any results and any feedback from us.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @SuperDre...

        Bzzzzt, wrong. Ctrl.Arrow moves control to the next grid line. WAY too far for fine tuning.

        Also, Access has things like Size to Widest, Sze to Tallest etc.

        If you don't like datbound controls, don't use them. But millions of others besides you find this useful

      • Eugênio Pacelli Salgado CanaanEugênio Pacelli Salgado Canaan commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        SuperDre, Milan Oparnica, Jonathan West

        Obrigado pela diversão, alegraram minha tarde chuvosa. KKKKKKKK
        Gentlemans, thanks for the fun KKKKKK

        Realy, pride... Pride is the real thing.
        Nothing else, nothing more.
        Pride

      • SuperDreSuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        "Access has superior form editing. For example I can hit Ctrl-Arrow to nudge the controls 1 pixel at a time"
        uhh, didn't know that wasn't possible in VB6, I've been doing that for years..

        And I'm not particular fond of databound controls, there is always something slow and tacky with them.. Hated them in VB6 and still do in VB.NET.. I'd rather code some extra than needing to rely on databound controls..

      • MIlan OparnicaMIlan Oparnica commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Pride could be the only reason for ignoring this thread and overall appeal of VB6 community.

        We know, and Visual Studio team knows that improving VB6 is not such a tremendous task after all, but nothing can be as dumb as an over-payed engineer obsessed by pride.

        "Sorry seams to be the hardest word."

      • Jonathan WestJonathan West commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        The mistake Microsoft made was not to realise that a new platform does not require the wholesale replacement of languages which compiled to the old platform.

        Just imagine how difficult and expensive it would have been to rewrite Windows itself had Microsoft made the new .NET-compatible version of C++ as incompatible with old code as they did with the VB6 to VB.NET transition.

        High-level languages exist in part for the specific purpose of insulating the programmer from changes in platform. This basic fact of computer science was forgotten by Microsoft, perhaps in part because *they* didn't have much code of their own written in VB6.

        But you might notice that they avoided compounding their error with regard to VBA. At one point Microsoft seriously contemplated dropping VBA from Office and replacing it with some sort of embedded .NET-based language. At the time I spoke to a person who has heavily involved in the project, and I told him that it was an excellent decision if he wanted to be forever tagged as the person responsible for throwing away a third of Microsoft's revenue.

        He didn't get it until I explained in detail what would happen. There's a *lot* of VBA code in use, in a large number of very big companies. Complex Excel workbooks in financial institutions, Access workgroup databases, Access front ends to larger databases, Word templates with VBA code for automation. I pointed out that I, as a single developer had tens of thousands of users dependent on VBA code running the Word, Excel and PowerPoint templates I had created for a number of companies. Multiply that by all the people coding VBA in different companies and their users.

        I explained that if VBA goes, then no company will be able to move to a new version of Office that lacks VBA until all their VBA code has been replaced with something that will work on the replacement platform. For most companies, the existing version of Office is "good enough" and they will stick with it rather than spend a lot of money rewriting their code to get back to where they started but with a new version of Office.

        And if they don't spend their money on a new version of Office, Microsoft isn't going to make money on a new version of Office. I told him that the person responsible for the decision to drop VBA will be the person blamed for the resulting loss of revenue. I heard the gulp down the telephone line as the the implications of this finally sank in.

        VBA is still here. Microsoft made a mistake not making people's existing VB6 code compatible with the new languages, and it has cost them. But they drew back from the even bigger mistake of doing the same with VBA.

        The VBA editor hasn't been updated since, so Microsoft's commitment to VBA can hardly be regarded as unstinting, but the platform is still there and has been included in the new 64-bit versions of Office 2010 and Office 2013.

        So it wouldn't be all that hard to bring out a standalone version that could offer an upgrade path for VB6 code. I doubt that they will do it though. Too much pride at stake.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Re multi-threading. I do it all the time in VB6

        It's true you can't have a multi-threaded VB6 EXE. However you can build a multi-threaded *solution*.

        Create another ActiveX EXE server and connect it through callbacks. This gives you another asynchronous thread.

        I have many production apps running to this day using this technique

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I've been a VBer since day 1. I learned basic in school on the Commodore PET. Been in IT for 25 years and developed for major financial/insurance firms in Toronto.

        Here's what MSFT should do - merge VB6 and Office/VBA (especially Access) to produce an ultimate development platform, as an alternative to .NET

        -Office products already contain VBA anyway so it wouldn't be a big stretch to do this.

        -VB6 doesn't support Unicode for internationalization but Access does. So replace VB forms with Access forms and controls

        -Access has superior form editing. For example I can hit Ctrl-Arrow to nudge the controls 1 pixel at a time

        -You'd have data-bound controls natively without cumbersome database coding

        -Access has a beautiful and powerful report engine to replace Crystal which I never liked anyway

        -But allow compiling to standalone EXEs rather than the Access runtime engine

        This would be the ultimate, VB6 back in action and improved with the features and functionality already present in Access

      • YacataYacata commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        You will never learn! Visual Studio team will waste a few more years and after that a smarter Visual Studio team will bring back Visual Basic 6.0.

        I do not understand how you can be so blind! Like you intentionally sabotage Microsoft ! For now, Visual Studio team spends money on VB.NET without any results and any feedback from us.

      • SuzanaSuzana commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Microsoft may be sabotaged through very bad decisions, VB6 case is a good example.

      • MIlan OparnicaMIlan Oparnica commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Somebody earlier "joked" about ReactOS. It's still under heavy development, but there is one post I would like to share. It gives a (somewhat) interesting point on MS killing it's developing tools.

        "...So the people or group that will likely suffer the greatest long term harm is not the developers that had their tools deprecated, but Microsoft itself..."

        You can read the whole thing on http://www.reactos.org/node/638

      • JohnJohn commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        .net is overly rationalized, overly academic, overly bloated, and overly verbose. Vb6 had purity and directness. Please hear our pleas.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I've invested 20 years in coding in this language, why would you let me retain my skills?

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