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    Eugene shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    8384 comments

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      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        >> "Don't you think that different people may have different opinions? Some may like C++ some may like C# and java and others may even be stuck at VB6, like you. ;-)"

        But you told us today you consider "Java, Cpp, C# and other unpleasant languages"

        So you don't like Java, C++, C# and VB6 and VB (you have said this using your TEKILA false name today, which even you can't deny).
        It doesn't leave you many languages to have your different opinion about ;)

        It's because VB6 programming is inside your head :)

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Jon aka Sten

        Don't you think that different people may have different opinions? Some may like C++ some may like C# and java and others may even be stuck at VB6, like you. ;-)

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        >> "Personally I am a C++ programmer .... I have never used C# or java." - October 20, 2017

        > Prove that "TEKILA" said that. ;-)

        That's why you have to generate new accounts each day. :)

        It's because VB6 programming is inside your head :)

      • terry commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Sten

        Why do you defend VB6 so much? What do you have to lose? As you said M$ supports it until 2025, so no issue there. You have about 10 more years to learn DotNet. Even you can do it,c'mon.

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        And while you are thinking about those lies...

        Explain the difference between...
        "MS is NOT committed to support it until 2025."
        and...
        "MS just promises that "Windows OS" will support VB6 until 2025."

        It's because VB6 programming is inside your head :)

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        And what about today's statements, or are you trying to deny you said this too...

        And today you say about VB6 "Use java or c# instead."

        And today you also call Java and C# 'unpleasant' - "user-unfriendly C syntax (Like Java, Cpp, C# and other unpleasant languages)."

        In which of those statements were you lying?

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Jon aka Sten

        Why do you hide behind pseudo-name Jon?? Don't be a chicken. Be like MichaelE. Defend VB6 using ONE name. ;-)

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >>"And today you also call Java and C# 'unpleasant' - "user-unfriendly C syntax (Like Java, Cpp, C# and other unpleasant languages)."

        Did not say that VB6 is better than Java and C#. ;-)

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Jon

        >> "Personally I am a C++ programmer .... I have never used C# or java." - October 20, 2017

        Prove that "TEKILA" said that. ;-)

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        And today you say about VB6 "Use java or c# instead."

        And today you also call Java and C# 'unpleasant' - "user-unfriendly C syntax (Like Java, Cpp, C# and other unpleasant languages)."

        In which of those statements were you lying?

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        You say...

        >> "Personally I am a C++ programmer .... I have never used C# or java." - October 20, 2017

        >> "I assure you that I am a full fledged professional with a company under my name. We use NET technologies and we encourage everyone to do the same." - November 5, 2017

        Were you lying in October or are you lying now?

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Jon

        Repetitions are healthy because it will put DotNet inside your head. I am happy that other contributors Chickho and Mightyduck agree with me on all those articles and VB6 being obsolete. ;-)

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Zagor's latest false username is "TEKILA"

        Let's have some fun comparing new poster "TEKILA" posts today with with his older posts ;)

        TEKILA - "VB6 is obsolete. Evolution went a long way up to VB.NET..."
        Chickho - "VB6 is obsolete. Evolution went a long way up to VB.NET..." August 21, 2016

        TEKILA - "NET has a loosely-coupled architecture..."
        Chickho - "NET has a loosely-coupled architecture..." August 21, 2016

        TEKILA - "I think Microsoft made the right decision in freezing VB6..."
        Chickho - "I think Microsoft made the right decision in freezing VB6..." August 21, 2016

        TEKILA - "VB is and was a 'toy' language..."
        Chickho - "VB is and was a 'toy' language..." August 21, 2016
        Mightyduck - "VB is and was a 'toy' language..." November 3, 2016

        TEKILA - "After 6 versions and 6 service packs..."
        Chickho - "After 6 versions and 6 service packs..." August 21, 2016
        Mightyduck - "After 6 versions and 6 service packs..." November 3, 2016

        ....and many, many more.

        It's because VB6 programming is inside your head :)

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA

        >> "They are either quite simple or not so complex." :)

        I'm sure you will explain the difference between "quite simple" and "not so complex" ;)

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @TEKILA thanks very much for your posts.

        My pleasure. I will keep on posting many more. :-)

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        "Why is Microsoft committed to supporting it until 2025? "

        MS is NOT committed to support it until 2025. MS supports active platforms like .NET. MS just promises that "Windows OS" will support VB6 until 2025. There is NO maintenance, NO patch, NO upgrades. DOTNET has all those three, so DOTNET is supported NOT VB6! I thought you knew the meaning of "support".

        " Why do my VB6 apps never crash?"

        I don't know your apps. They are either quite simple or not so complex. You must also be aware that it is impossible to write enterprise apps with VB6 unless you want to make a mess out of it. VB6 has always been a mess not suitable for OOP. Everyone should dump it, unless you are too old and lazy to learn new stuff. That's why I call VB6 a garbage in today's standards.

        "Do you have a real name and resume we can view online?"

        Of course I have and I have online resume too. However why do you want to know all this? If I tell you my name and email you can be sure that the trolls will be on it in no time. So I prefer not to give it away. I hope you understand. I assure you that I am a full fledged professional with a company under my name. We use NET technologies and we encourage everyone to do the same.

      • MichaelE commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >> VB6 is obsolete.

        @TEKILA

        Why is Microsoft committed to supporting it until 2025?
        Why do my VB6 apps never crash?
        Do you have a real name and resume we can view online?

        @TEKILA thanks very much for your posts.

      • Jon commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Amusing how Zagor the troll sock puppet has to generate new accounts each day. :)
        What a sad and desperate obsessive compulsive.

        It's because VB6 programming is inside your head :)

      • TEKILA commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        VB6 is obsolete. Evolution went a long way up to VB.NET. VB6 was just simple programming language, that you could learn quite fast (event with no programming knowledge base), but you will explore it's weakness soon! I was starting with VB6 and I also liked it! It was easy, simple but very, very limited. And there was a lot of "bad" things. Bad technics , On Error statement, unique, one and only MID statement and others..).
        VB.NET has the same language. BUT, VB.NET is real object oriented language, you have full control of your code, things became transparent and VB.NET is the same powerfull as C# (and better thend granny Java, without complacency of C++ and without user-unfriendly C syntax (Like Java, Cpp, C# and other unpleasant languages).

        WPF and VB.Net is one of the fastest prototyping tools I know of

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