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    Eugene shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    9359 comments

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      • Microsoft, update VB6 programming & VBA programming commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        This is the Microsoft support statement for VB6 programming...

        Support Statement for Visual Basic 6.0 on Windows
        (Note: The support policy below has been updated with Windows 10 version 1709 support information.)

        The Visual Basic team is committed to "It Just Works" compatibility for Visual Basic 6.0 applications on the following supported Windows operating systems:

        Windows 10
        Windows 8.1
        Windows 7
        Windows Server 2016
        Windows Server 2012 including R2
        Windows Server 2008 including R2

        The Visual Basic team’s goal is that Visual Basic 6.0 applications continue to run on supported Windows versions.
        As detailed in this document, the core Visual Basic 6.0 runtime will be supported for the full lifetime of supported Windows versions, which is five years of mainstream support followed by five years of extended support.

        The VB6 runtime will ship and will be supported in Windows 10 for the lifetime of the OS (that is until at least 2025).
        The VB6 runtime will ship and will be supported in Windows Server 2016 for the lifetime of the OS (that is until at least 2027).

        https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/visualstudio/visual-basic-6/visual-basic-6-support-policy

      • kontex commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        People who play anonymous have no *** in their pants.
        This lobbyism shows that there are people who have existential fear of VB6.
        Why else should someone deal with something that does not concern Him?

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Time to get over it, Lofaday.

        If you have something to put forward, do so.

        But don't blame others for your failure to offer anything other than words.
        No one but yourself has "derailed" your non-offering.

        You either offer something or you don't. Don't blame others when you offered nothing but talk.

        It was you who decided to take your ball home. No one else made that decision for you.

        You make the decisions about what you do, no one else can take the praise or the blame.

      • Lofaday - www VB64 com - A new IDE is on its way commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Why is everyone "Anonymous"? Are you too lazy to make up a moniker or are you cowards?

        The great RAD paradigm, personified by and peaking with VB6 -- cut adrift by clueless Microsoft Harvard suits, but sunk by the toxic VB6 community, the archetypal losers who would rather cut off their noses to spite their faces than actually pay for, promote, encourage or otherwise make-happen a solution.

        Instead, they skulk in the shadows behind "anonymous", derailing any attempt to revive a positive paradigm through pure bigotry. After the failure of every attempt at a commercial solution, they even take a gift of open source and send it packing with bile, cynicism and contempt.

        A warm place in **** is reserved for the cowardly anonymous's who can't even be relied on to put forward a coherent argument by choosing a name so they can be replied to.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        There is still room for VB6 programming.

        Microsoft didn't improve on VB6; they tried to kill it off and have spent the last 15 years trying (and failing) to reinvent it.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        The Microsoft OS guys write in C++ and work with COM interfaces. To them .NET, and C# in particular, were and are alien technologies.

        It is this lack of support from the systems programmers that has led to the demise of .NET.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        .NET was a wonderfully ambitious project and in one move it caused Microsoft to dump all that it had at the time - Visual Basic 6 in particular and C++ MFC/ATL to a lesser extent. You need to recall that at the time VB6 was the biggest language on the planet and was used by everyone. Some say that it would be again if Microsoft allowed it to return.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        "In one of the most disconnected decisions in the whole history of Microsoft, back in 1998 the languages team decided to kill Visual Basic 6 to make sure that its new .NET initiative had a better chance of success.

        The reason it was, and still is, disconnected, is that Office used VBA as its macro or scripting language and VBA is essentially VB6. Despite several attempts to get .NET into Office most users are stuck with VBA as a scripting language. Now that .NET is also on its way out it seems doubtful that it will ever become the scripting environment for Excel."

        http://www.i-programmer.info/news/167-javascript/11835-excel-gets-javascript.html

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Jetbrains 2018 survey.

        Most popular JavaScript editors/IDE's

        1) Visual Studio Code
        2) Webstorm/JetBrains
        3) Atom

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Jetbrains 2018 survey.

        Programing languages learning/learnt in last 12 months

        1) Python
        2) JavaScript
        3) Java
        4) Go
        5=) Typescript
        5=) Kotlin

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Jetbrains 2018 survey.

        Primary Programming languages

        1) Java
        2) JavaScript
        3) Python

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Jetbrains 2018 survey.

        Top programming languages

        1) JavaScript
        2) HTML/CSS
        3) Java
        4) SQL
        5) Python

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Yes, VB.Net should never have been invented. It failed in its aim of replacing VB6 and has been in a long term decline.

        Just like C# failed in its stated aim of overtaking Java, and it too is now declining.

        Old languages for old times, they just haven't kept up with todays requirements.

        That's why there are only 1.8 million C# developers, 180,000 VB.Net developers and 18,000 F# developers.

        Meanwhile Microsoft jumps on every bandwagon to try and keep .Net afloat. A few months ago Xamarin was going to be the saviour of .Net. Then .Net Core. Now WebAssembly is the new messiah. Next month something different.

        .Net is just legacy now. But there will be plenty of maintenance work to keep old applications running, and keep the fanbois happy.

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