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    Eugene shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    9528 comments

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      • DDownloads.net commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        MS must be blind and does not really know the scope of the support VB6 still has. There so many good Apps out there written in VB6 e.g. Malwarebytes Antimalware, MyPhoneExplorer etc.

        They should run some statistics on searches for VB6 code and will be more than surprised maybe even shocked.

        Also our flagship "DDownloads" (an App Store with Modern UI) is written in VB6
        http://ddownloads.net/download/viewdownload/30-ddownloads-portable/124-ddownloads

        Microsoft pelase bring us back Classic Visual Basic, and allow us 64 bits compilation.

      • Tim commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I believe that MS is just losing a large source of income by not updating VB6.
        Not to say that the current version has really hindered me in developing new, complex, line-of-business applications. As they are mostly based on databases, my clients and myself are very happy with the database response times...far better than .Net.

        Is it just snobbish pride, or saving-of-face, for MS not to admit that VB6 is the most popular MS language currently. There is no shortage of work available here in Australia/New Zealand for good VB6 programmers – maintenance and new projects.

      • SuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        I don't know, just keep it for now, but I just don't think it will be fronted.. but who knows..

      • SuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Marius, you really think that your articles are getting to the frontpage? think again.. And submitting 2 almost the same articles might even put slashdot off from fronting it..

      • Fatina commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Hi, I was banned on a VB forum site for no real reason, just for pointing out the qualities of VB6 :( :

        "You have been banned for the following reason: Re-posting something that a moderator had deleted. Date the ban will be lifted: May 22nd, 2014, 04:00 PM"

        My comments regarding VB6 are here, tell me that they are right and I will never post anything !:

        http://www.vbforums.com/showthread.php?t=764299&goto=newpost

        http://www.vbforums.com/showthread.php?t=605992&goto=newpost

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        VB6 works great with the new Oracle 12c 32-bit client too. Looking forward to a 64-bit version of VB6! Come on Microsoft are you listening?

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >Has anyone got the vb runtime working on Windows 2012 server core

        VB-Runtime V6.0.98.15 is part of my server 2012 standard. My VB programm working great.

      • VB6 Fire commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Miquel

        the "article" from your link is from 2004 :)

        Many things from there are not true and we know why now.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >We should start seeking out alternative ways to get the VB6 message out if MS continue to fail to act.

        You are right. Without public attention Microsoft will ignore this proposal. We should design a joint press release and send it to all big publications.

      • Dennis Johnson commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Damien HOFFSCHIR
        I never said that VB6 is the future. After all, there is no such thing in computer technology. The only things that change are: performance, usability and tools (that provide the computer user the necessary usability -- read: programming tools). This is where we are. Microsoft decided to throw away the tool called VB6, in order to promote the Net framework. But now it seems that this tool is excellent for its job and shouldn't have been thrown away. Why not update it, since it works (almost) perfectly, even 16 years after its first release (14 years after its last service pack)?

      • SuperDre commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Damien HOFFSCHIR: well, that's the problem with ANY development language/framework, never expect it to be the future.. And MS has shown a lot of times in the past that they dump important frameworks/technologies in a heartbeat, even though it is used by a lot of developers.. All they really care for is getting revenue, and that's accomplished by dumping and recreating new frameworks (because .NET for instance certainly isn't better than anything we had before it, it's just the same in a new flavor)..

      • Damien HOFFSCHIR commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Dennis Johnson : I understand your point of view very well. You want to use VB6 (for whatever reason). Again, MS should release the IDE source code for all folks that are stuck with VB6. But please, don't pretend VB6 is the futur :)

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        We should start seeking out alternative ways to get the VB6 message out if MS continue to fail to act. I am speaking of the press. Maybe when it is on CNN they will have to act. They are leaving us behind. The VB6 professional developer community.

        We have and continue to build the worlds most reliable and innovative applications. We don't deserve to be neglected. Its time the large media organizations weigh in.

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