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    EugeneEugene shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    7635 comments

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      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        Just show me an app made with that wannabe tool. Give me the best example you have. Impress me.

        WHAT ? YOU CAN'T ? WHAT A SURPRISE !

        PS: Visual Basic 6.0 is a god in this world ! ;)

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @MichaelE

        "BTW, I've already posted my website, published books and more in these forums. "

        give me a link please, there are to many posts for me to search. Tnx

      • MichaelEMichaelE commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        >> ok. forget personal details. Just tell me if you have any .NET experience.

        Sorry I am only interested in interacting with real people. Do you have a linkedin account or anything where we can see you are not just a spam account troll?

        BTW, I've already posted my website, published books and more in these forums. Glad to do it again for you...if you are a real person. Glad too man!

      • Microsoft, update VB6 programming & VBA programmingMicrosoft, update VB6 programming & VBA programming commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Microsoft have demoed Windows 10 on ARM video at Build 2017.

        http://www.pcmag.com/news/353637/windows-10-on-arm-runs-all-win32-apps-unmodified

        An ARM tablet/laptop/PC running Windows 10 can be treated just like any other PC. That means any Win32 application can be downloaded, installed, and run unmodified and as if you're on an x86 machine.
        Windows 10 on ARM translates all the x86 instructions to ARM64 at runtime so as the user gets the exact same experience regardless of what their base hardware is. Those translations are also cached, meaning over time all the applications you use regularly will improve in performance. The example Microsoft uses in the video above is 7-Zip, which is downloaded from the web and installed.

        VB6 apps will run on ARM and the VB6 programming IDE will run also.

      • Microsoft, update VB6 programming & VBA programmingMicrosoft, update VB6 programming & VBA programming commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Microsoft have announced the extension of support of VB6 to Windows Server 2016. VB6 is supported until at least November 2027 on Windows Server 2016, and until at least 2025 on Windows 10. Both are likely to be extended.

        Support Statement for Visual Basic 6.0 on Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012, Windows 10, and Windows Server 2016
        https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/articles/visual-basic/reference/vb6-support

        VB6 programming is supported on Windows 10, Windows Server 2016 and earlier versions of Windows.
        VBA programming is supported on Office 2016 and earlier versions of Office.
        VBScript programming is still part of Windows.

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        Just show me an app made with that wannabe tool. Give me the best example you have. Impress me.

        WHAT ? YOU CAN'T ? WHAT A SURPRISE !

        PS: Visual Basic 6.0 is a god in this world ! ;)

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        First, let me say i love VB6. It has a great IDE, great debugging tools, very extensible, has enough power for most tasks, easy to add more horsepower in teh form in C dlls or COM objects, and makes GUI stuff an absolute breeze.

        Sure i wish it had the capability of linking in C obj files, inline asm, directly linked in VB runtime, and some more default libraries like php has access to by default...but .NET was .NOT the answer.

        In the early days of Java, everyone was all *********** on platform independance and web integration. The marketers went nuts pushing wares. MS hopped on board with J# until they got sued and lost. Now we have .NET which i consider to be MSs old J# retooled and reworked in their own flavor of poo.

        I understand the .NET good debugging capabilities and a powerful IDE, and addresses some of the shortfalls i find with vb6, however they turned it into even a greater pile of bloatware. Everyone used to complain about the 1mb vb runtime that installed in seconds. So they turned around and created a 25mb runtime for .NET that takes tens of minutes to download and then tens of minutes to install.

        What sparks this post is me looking at my add remove programs list. Right now I have 3 versions of that blasted runtime installed on my machine, each taking up close to 200mb a piece. Its just bloated ****.

        Honestly i guess I am also a little peeved that VB.NET has very little in common with VB6. You cant realistically covert the code over. You can use old code as COM objects but still. Also I hate the class layout of Java and .NET. Its academic in design. Overly long and nested classes and object encapsulation. Makes all your code lines needlessly long.

        I do understand its powerful to use .NET on embedded devices. To have one programming model across different processors and memory models, but for desktop development .NET is garbage in my book no matter how much they hype it. I wont even begin to talk about their web forms mess. ASP and PHP are still better solutions in my book.

        Part of me also cant help but feel that their desire to incite the new language of the day isnt driven by their need to ship more product and refresh their IDE sales.

        As a developer i dont need mindless break neck innovation just because you need more sales volume. I need a stable workable tool that lets me earn a living without having to go back and learn the ABCs of your language du jour.

        If these are the choice we must make, then i would much rather pay a subscription yearly for continued license to my development IDE and operating system so that both of us have a stable operating base and tool set. Most of the innovations in VISTA are garbage also.

        Mindless "innovation" and media hype for home users and fluff to sell the next sales unit.

        Author: Dave

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        VB6 is faster than C++ ! Your wannabe tool is nonexistent in this. Stop the false posts on your own forum.

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        Just show me an app made with that wannabe tool. Give me the best example you have. Impress me.

        PS: Visual Basic 6.0 is a god in this world ! ;)

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        Just stop the compare betwin the VB6 god and that wannabe tool with false posts on their own forum !

      • Zagor TenayZagor Tenay commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @jeremyg

        Why don't you like .NET? I can guide you to some very nice learning material. You will love and enjoy .NET. I am quite sure. VB6 is outdated and most developers hate it. Let me know if you are interested. Thanks

      • Zagor TenayZagor Tenay commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @jeremyg

        You can install VisualStudio 2017 via it's new installer. It is lightning fast to install and to launch apps. BTW why are you concerned about 25mb runtime? Any computer today comes with giga or even terabytes of HD and RAM.

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        Just show me an app made with that wannabe tool. Give me the best example you have. Impress me.

        PS: Visual Basic 6.0 is a god in this world ! ;)

      • jeremygjeremyg commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Zagor Tenay

        Just stop the compare betwin the VB6 god and that wannabe tool with false posts on their own forum !

      • Richard CollierRichard Collier commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        C# Decline
        ========

        C#, the Microsoft .Net language has been declining for over 5 years.

        https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/csharp/

        Why does Microsoft's 'premier' language which is constantly being updated by Microsoft, being promoted by Microsoft and its fanbois, being extended with products like Xamarin, and best of all is now given away FREE, just keep on declining in popularity ?

        Why is Microsoft C# in a 5 year decline ?

        Why do less and less people use C# each year ?

        Source: Zagor Tenay

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