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    Eugene shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

    We have read all of the comments on this thread and I’d like to thank you for providing your constructive feedback on this issue. Instead of merely repeating our support and migration guidance that has been laid out on http://msdn.com/vbrun, I’d like to address some of your specific comments here.

    To play back the feedback themes we’re hearing:
    - VB6 is awesome
    - VB6 needs to be brought forward and maintained: in a new release or OSS

    VB6 was and still is without a doubt awesome. VB6 made developers incredibly productive building a breadth of applications and as a result we have a wealth of applications and passionate developers to this day in 2014. One way I see our mission in developer tools is to empower developers to solve problems. This includes both today’s problems AND the problems of tomorrow. VB6, as you all have stated repeatedly in this thread, is an excellent tool for solving the problems of its day. We also stand behind our decision starting in 2002 to meet the current demands of our developers and the industry with .NET. For the scenarios VB6 set out to do, we see VB6 being “complete”. We feel good about VB6 being able to continue maintaining their applications for the past 15 years. Current needs ranging from distributed applications and services, to web applications and services, to devices, to new architectures and languages, required fundamental changes to the whole stack. We looked at how we could accommodate these needs through incremental changes to VB6 while maintaining its essence, and that was not possible.

    To address the modern needs we would need to go far beyond updating the language. We have to remember that VB6 is not just a language. VB6 is a language, a runtime, a platform library, a tool/IDE, and an ecosystem tightly packaged together in a way that made all of them work well together. We’ve worked with many customers on migration from VB6 to .NET and found that while yes, there are language changes, the dominating factor in migration difficulties isn’t the language differences. Even open sourcing the language/runtime wouldn’t solve the fact that VB6 was thought for a different set of problems, and the fact that its strength came from the end-to-end solution provided by all these five pieces working together. Take a change like 64bit, the complete runtime, tools and ecosystem chain would need to be retooled.

    So, moving forward what can we do? Where we have been able to help move forward is in our stance around support and interoperability. The VB6 runtime it is still a component of the Windows operating system and is a component shipped in Windows 8.1. It will be supported at least through 2024. This ensures your apps and components continue to run as you incrementally move forward to .NET. The support policy is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ms788708. There are numerous interop strategies that we developed and evolved to enable incremental migration as you upgrade your skills, described here: http://msdn.com/vbrun.

    In summary, VB6 was awesome. We agree. We don’t expect or demand anyone to throw away their code or rewrite from any of our technologies unless it makes business sense for them to do so. We have to innovate to enable our customers to innovate. It is not a viable option to create a next version of VB6. We stand by our decision to make VB.NET and the .NET Framework. We think they are awesome too. It is not feasible to open source VB6 tools chain and ecosystem. The VB6 runtime was last shipped in Windows 8.1 and will be supported for the lifetime of Windows 8.1. Support and interop are great tools to move forward incrementally.

    I hope you feel we’ve listened to your feedback and that I’ve explained things well enough that you understand our decision.

    Paul Yuknewicz
    Group Program Manager
    Microsoft Visual Studio Cloud Tools

    9317 comments

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      • Lofaday - www VB64 com - A new IDE is on its way commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        "VB6sters"... I like it. Hipsters who look a gift horse in the mouth.

        Dot Net has it's place. I'm in media just now, and they use it a lot. Personally, I'd recommend "java processing" (google it). The Arduino IDE is near identical.

        At some point I will press on with 0AV, but the decision has been made (between myself and partners), VB6 will have nothing to do with it, and the solution will be commercial and not open source.

        VB6 buried.. but perhaps a distant inspiration.

        ..ie: It was hoped that the VB6 "community" (who turned out to be a bunch of weird old men in white pointy hats) would accept the gift of a solution, which was to be for free, in return for their championing our "gift". Not so.. If vbForums.com is anything to go by, VB6 is in the hands of a geriatric appreciation society who have unwittingly made it about as forward thinking as a steam engine in a vintage tractor museum.

        A lesson has been learnt.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @VB6 programming just got a big boost from Microsoft

        >> "I foresee at least another ten years of life for VB6."

        >> These life-extenders are driving VB6 detractors barking mad. :) :) :-)

        And will continue to do so for at least 10 more years.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Lofaday

        Put a sock in it, Lofaday.

        No one trolled you. They just said, in effect, 'put up or shut up'. You weren't willing to show any software, if and when you are show it to us. We are actually keen to see it.

        Otherwise you risk becoming increasingly bitter and twisted like Zagor who just hangs around here copying and pasting irrelevant posts.

        Remember, VB6 programming looks like lasting as long as Windows. That means anyone trying to offer an alternative has to have a very good offering. Microsoft couldn't do it, either with VB.Net or C#, just not good enough. Same with others who tried.

        VB6 is Microsoft's most popular ever language. Nothing they produced since has come close.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        "...be trolled myself by belligerent VB6ers who don't want solutions but only want to be the guardians of a mummified relic"

        I guess the "mummified relic" must be VB6. Ingenious Poetry!!!

        LMAOROF!!!!

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @LofaDay

        Agreed 100%. VB6sters spend their time trolling instead of promoting VB6. In the meantime .NET with around 10Million users is getting more popular by the day.

        ASP.NET is at the top of web development. Xamarin rocks! and now Blazor is the new kid on the block.

        Time to start .NET and dump the old dinosaur called VB6!

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        ASP.NET just got a big boost from Microsoft!!!

        Top 10 Websites Written Using ASP.NET MVC

        With all of the millions of websites out there, how many were built with ASP.NET MVC? In today's post, I show the most successful ASP.NET MVC commercial sites.

        ASP.NET MVC is becoming more popular with each version released.

        Personally, I've been extremely happy with MVC since inception. I was looking for a better way to build websites instead of using WebForms.

        However, I can sit here and tell you all of the benefits of ASP.NET MVC, but until you see an example website, I'm just flapping my gums.

        That's what developers are looking for: real-world examples of ASP.NET MVC websites in the wild. It's making it hard for developers to justify spending time learning ASP.NET MVC.

        I've provided sample MVC projects, but it's not the same as a full-fledged production site.

        BuiltWith.com is a site for Internet statistics. You can find out what sites are "built with" what technologies (get it?) ;-)

        If we look at every framework on the Internet (yes, on the entire Internet), you'll see ASP.NET and PHP are the kings with ASP.NET MVC sites taking up a 1% of the share (Although, I do worry about the sites with Classic ASP).

        BuiltWith.com/Frameworks screenshot
        So if 1% of the Internet is ASP.NET MVC and it's so popular, where are the websites built with this Microsoft technology?

        Here are the most well-known sites I've found running ASP.NET MVC.

        To read more==>https://www.danylkoweb.com/Blog/top-10-websites-written-using-aspnet-mvc-JK

      • Lofaday - www VB64 com - A new IDE is on its way commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Well, that's this forum toast. Get a room guys! I know these trolls are relentless, but having formed a plan and started to get commercial interest for a VB6 upgrade, only to be trolled myself by belligerent VB6ers who don't want solutions but only want to be the guardians of a mummified relic, I rather wonder if either side is better?

        I conclude VB6 may have been amazing, but VB6 as a brand has become toxic and no entrepreneur will ever step in. Anything remotely VB6 - ie: anything with the name "basic" in it - has thus become a poison chalice to the commercial world. Some of these folk have become so used to getting software tools for free, they not only demand it, they neglect to even be grateful or tolerant to those who supply them free goods.

        Therre are a lot of VB6ers out there who were all mouth and no trousers, who screamed for solutions then lifted not even a finger when kickstarters etc were presented to them, or indeed they opposite - they trolled these solutions. Some pretended to be interested but turned out to just be exploiters also looking for a free ride.

        They should be ashamed because they are the ones who are really responsible for the death of VB6.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Jennifer says
        There is the difference. I will try to keep it simple. Nobody cares what kind of transportation you take going to work every morning. You can use your car, bike, local bus or even a donkey. However, if you try to convince everyone else that donkey is the best transportation method and talk about it, promote it non-stop, some people will rise up and tell you to shut up and to buzz off.
        It is a quite similar situation here. At this user voice forum, if you constantly talk about the virtues of VB6 (the donkey, or the dead horse to be perfect), people will get irritated and bring up some hard facts that indeed your attempts are hopeless. That is why I brought up the hard fact here that VB6 has been elected as the worst language ever for the last three years by a respected website (Stack Overflow).
        In short, do whatever you want to do with it, provided Windows still allows it, but don't come here and post repetitive spams to promote it or ad libitum ask to bring it back. Even MSFT has removed this forum from their user voice top ideas listings, regarding it as a spam. This type of manipulation becomes an insult to the intelligence of millions of young coders like myself.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        VB6 was a way for people to get started with programming. It is by no means capable to build software-systems that are planned entirely by architects. The most important terms here are scalability, maintainability, reusability and most importantly separability.
        Thinking that VB6 or anything alike should be used for professional purposes nowadays mainly shows the narrowness of one's horizon as well as missing advanced education.
        Use this for whatever small tools you want to create with it. It's okay, you learn a little how to program with this. But don't think that these tools you learn to work with are the tools you should work with in any company which wants to use your software for more than a couple of years.

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        .NET programming just got a big boost from Microsoft

        Just read the following links and immerse into marvelous .NET world!
        WebAssembly and the Death of JavaScript (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBYqen3B2gc)
        .NET and WebAssembly - Is this the future of the front-end? (https://www.hanselman.com/blog/NETAndWebAssemblyIsThisTheFutureOfTheFrontend.aspx)
        Blazor
        An experimental .NET web framework using C#/Razor and HTML that runs in the browser via WebAssembly (https://github.com/aspnet/blazor)

        TIOBE Index for May 2018
        C# AND VB.NET are 5th and 6th most popular languages. VB went down from 12th to 17th in one year.
        Time to drop VB6 and immerse in .NET!
        https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/

      • VB6 programming just got a big boost from Microsoft commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        An important boost for Visual Basic programming from Microsoft...

        "VB6 just got an important boost from Microsoft blogger Scott Hanselman. In his post, Hanselman shows how to configure a VB6 app to be hosted in the Windows 10 Store."

        "That’s huge, as hosting an app in the store means that Microsoft is at least somewhat vouching for its compatibility and content."

        "With these latest improvements to compatibility, I foresee at least another ten years of life for VB6."

        https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/mt846730

      • VB6 programming just got a big boost from Microsoft commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        @Jean

        >> Microsoft's VB6 programming language is the 13th most popular programming language in June 2018.
        >> The latest version of classic VB was launched in 1998, 20 years ago, and still rates highly in the Tiobe index of over 200 programming languages.

        >> https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index

        >> This shows VB6 programming is more popular than Perl, Swift, Assembly Language, Matlab, Go, Delphi and over 200 other programming languages.

        Don't tell@Anonymous. She'll be posting that Perl, Swift, Assembly Language, Matlab, Go, Delphi and over 200 other programming languages are all dead and will never come back. :) :) :)

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Just read the following links and immerse into marvelous .NET world!
        WebAssembly and the Death of JavaScript (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pBYqen3B2gc)
        .NET and WebAssembly - Is this the future of the front-end? (https://www.hanselman.com/blog/NETAndWebAssemblyIsThisTheFutureOfTheFrontend.aspx)
        Blazor
        An experimental .NET web framework using C#/Razor and HTML that runs in the browser via WebAssembly (https://github.com/aspnet/blazor)

        TIOBE Index for May 2018
        C# AND VB.NET are 5th and 6th most popular languages. VB went down from 12th to 17th in one year.
        Time to drop VB6 and immerse in .NET!
        https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/

      • Anonymous commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Latest data proves that there are over 10 MILLION .NET users!!! So the claims here that there are only 1.8M .NET users is a bogus, BS and outright Lie.

        Look at the latest figures:

        ~7 Million active monthly users of Visual Studio
        ~3.6 Million active monthly users of Visual Code

        7+3.6 >10Million!!!

        Also Popularity of C# stands at 34.4 (up this month)
        TypeScript is up 8% to 17.4
        Overall popularity of VS Code=~35%, Visual Studio=34.3

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bR4_PhmZPsk&list=PLmd6_Lxb_Um84734pYm-FdSb00qQUuacw&index=76&t=0s

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