Roger J. Wilco

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  1. 11,267 votes
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    under review  ·  512 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » .NET  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    @Oliver, did you read that WebAssembly article below? Apple is on board:
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/10/31/webassembly_browser_makers_buy_in/

    This doesn't circumvent the App Store anymore than "websites" (which are really just applications hosted in a web page) do. WebAssembly is also 20x faster than JavaScript, meaning if you code anything in JavaScript in the next year (or rather next March, after WebAssembly is released), you will be obsolete and considered a dinosaur.

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    @Christian, you say this is a confusing request, yet over 5,000 votes seem to understand it well enough. You also immediately say after that it is clear what is needed, so make up your mind! ;)

    Also, food for thought: if WebAssembly is considered HTML5-compliant, then a WebAssembly-based solution or application becomes HTML5-compliant by virtue.

    Otherwise, a MSFT-backed JSIL-type framework would still be perfectly acceptable. A small team out of France has been working on it for a full year now and is constantly making performance improvements. Imagine if a full MSFT division had been working on it since 2011 when Silverlight was put to bed? That's a full five years now, if you aren't keeping track of time:
    http://cshtml5.com
    http://jsil.org

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Yes it is interesting to say the least that this idea was only marked as Under Review without a single comment from our Visual Studio overlords. Did someone accidentally hit the wrong button when they were drunk or something? What say you Visual Studio team? It's been over 6 months now without a peep. Please tell us you are working on something good!

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    @Hakan, what's the problem? The problem with TypeScript is that it is incompatible with .NET. You basically have to write (and manage/maintain) two different code bases: one in .NET and one in TypeScript (JavaScript). This is very expensive for developers and organizations because they are solving the same sort of problems in both codebases but cannot easily share/leverage the knowledge between the two. With Silverlight you could use the same code between client and server and it saved a lot of time (and money).

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    +1 @ Anoymous. Xamarin (or rather, Xamarin.Forms) took their best stab at a very complicated problem, but the developer experience is less than ideal. For every new control you create you need to create 3 different renderers for it, which is very labor intensive. Their Xaml system is better than UWP in a lot of ways (markup extensions), but it is closed/internal and not very extensible.

    UWP has a strong modern client application model, but their Xaml system is terrible, really truly terrible. As in they deliberately worked to make it that bad. The ideal would be to take UWP's client model, and give it a good Xaml system (based on WPF's, ideally) and then make it cross platform via the new Xamarin magic.

    Once you get it working on WebAssembly, .NET will be unstoppable!

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Too big and far away? Cooments like that are exactly why we are in the mess we are in today. Did they say that with WPF? Or Azure? How about VS online? That took FOREVER to turn around but they have a great product now. Passion and vision is sorely lacking from MS it's probably dissenters are former employees trying to knock down the confidence of the giant trying to get back on its feet.

    Also, Xamarin is good, but as the links below show it doesn't support web like NodeJS. Very important or we all going to be Node developers in a few years and C# will be nothing but a relic.

    Roger J. Wilco supported this idea  · 
  2. 37 votes
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    5 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Cloud  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Roger J. Wilco supported this idea  · 
  3. 2,100 votes
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    244 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Languages - Visual Basic  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    As to your point: "It will simply fall apart, unless huge renovations are made to it. "

    That is exactly the point of this idea/suggestion/vote.

    Please try again.

    Your brogrammer,
    Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    ASP.NET Core is a server-side technology, not a client/browser-side technology as this request/suggestion/idea clearly desires. Please try again.

    Your compatriot,
    Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    Although you may not feel that Microsoft is capable of converting VB6 so that it operates under an HTML5-standards compliant browser, there are over 600 votes here that do. I am not sure if you are aware, but this is a suggestion/idea board, where passionate developers discuss what is possible, rather than what is not.

    While you are not passionate about VB6, many many developers (and organizations) are. That is the nature of the business and the reality we find ourselves in. As the 600 (and growing) votes here show, there is demand and interest.

    Incidentally, there is also demand and interest to get .NET working in the browser as well, and you can find that here:
    https://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio-2015/suggestions/10027638-create-a-ubiquitous-net-client-application-develo

    If .NET did indeed work in the browser, then what you are suggesting would carry more weight. Perhaps you should take a moment and vote for that suggestion there, so that the message you are preaching would be more convincing here.

    As this is a suggestion board to explore and discuss what is possible, I am sure everyone who has taken time to vote for this popular request would appreciate your support and encouragement to protect their countless investments in their technology, rather than finding ways to say that it is not possible.

    As Microsoft has clearly demonstrated time and time again, anything is indeed possible with their immense resources and incredible pool of talent.

    Thank you for your support,
    Your compadre and amigo Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    Thank you for your reply. This request is to enable VB6 so that it renders in a cross-platform, HTML5-compliant fashion in every modern browser. You can read more of it here:
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/mt632280

    .NET does not render in a browser. Therefore, if a VB6 developer or organization follows your advice, they will be required to learn two languages: C# for the server-side (ASP.NET Core), and then JavaScript for any client-side (browser) renderings.

    .NET and JavaScript are completely incompatible with each other, meaning that as a result, any organization/developer who chooses to pursue such endeavors using your suggestion will result in two different, incompatible code bases: one in C# and one in JavaScript.

    You claim that this is the "Simplest and best development model" but what this request is asking for is to have VB6 run in the browser as fully standards-compliant HTML5, so that VB6 developers can leverage their existing knowledge and simply carry forward with their existing language and investments.

    What you suggest requires learning (and maintaining) two different languages (and code bases).

    What this idea suggests is continuing with one language that is already familiar with hundreds of thousands of developers and organizations. You can read more about this suggestion here:
    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/mt632280

    Thank you for your understanding,
    Your pally wally Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    As difficult as it is to accept facts, .NET does not work in a browser. You are suggesting that VB6 developers drop one language (VB6) to learn two (JavaScript and C#). This is not a viable course of action for many developers and the organizations that employ them.

    Kindly,
    Your Pal Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    You claim that ASP.NET Core removes "No more complex javascript and bunch of unreliable spaghetti code" but the only way to work in a browser is with JavaScript, which is inherently unreliable and made of spaghetti.

    Are you suggesting that VB users ditch one language (VB) to learn two (JavaScript and C#)?

    Successfully confused and concerned,
    Your pal Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay,

    ASP.NET based on C# for the server, but JavaScript for the client. These are completely incompatible languages and with many overlapping concerns. As such, solutions built using this fragmented approach result in a tremendous amount of duplicated code and efforts, making it very expensive for organizations and the developers they employ to struggle between the two languages.

    So to be sure, are you suggesting VB developers to ditch one language (VB) in exchange for two (C# and JS)? That sounds like a very expensive proposition.

    Dazed and Confused,
    Your buddy Roger J. Wilco

    Roger J. Wilco commented  · 

    Dear Zagor Tenay:

    Can you show us how Xamarin works in a HTML5 web page like this idea requires?

    Best regards,
    Keeping it real

    Roger J. Wilco supported this idea  · 
  4. 3,662 votes
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    53 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Mobile App Development  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
    Roger J. Wilco supported this idea  · 

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