Justin

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  1. 1 vote
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      0 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Languages - Visual Basic  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
      Justin shared this idea  · 
    • 183 votes
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        14 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Languages - C#  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
      • 5,399 votes
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          93 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Languages - C#  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
          Justin supported this idea  · 
          Justin commented  · 

          I would go farther, and request an option (per project, or per file) to make the default to disallow null for fields, variables, and parameters. Then introduce a symbol or keyword to make it clear which can be null. Most importantly do it for VB too.
          void foo(Bar br, Baz? bz) {
          String s1 = br.getNotNull();
          String s2 = bz.getNotNull(); // Compile error. bz might be null
          if (bz == null) {
          return;
          }
          String s3 = bz.getNotNull(); // Now it's OK. Compiler knows not null .
          String s4 = bz.getMayBeNull(); // Compile error
          String? s5 = bz.getMayBeNull(); // Now it's OK
          }
          For VB I would use a keyword
          Sub Foo(br As Bar, Optional bz as Baz)
          Optional s5 as String = bz.getMayBeNull()

        • 543 votes
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            10 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » Languages - C#  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
          • 1,139 votes
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              34 comments  ·  Visual Studio IDE » IDE and Editor  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

              Hi Supporters of this item,

              We are considering making this available as an option in a future release of Visual Studio.

              If this is made available, we expect the feature to need to be optional as there are many who prefer the current keybinding of Ctrl+W to stay as it is.

              Thanks
              Mark Wilson-Thomas
              Program Manager, Visual Studio IDE Team

              Justin commented  · 

              I disagree. It's a travesty that Ctrl+W has ever been used for this purpose. It's as if starting today, it slowly became common on linux or osx to use Ctrl+C to close apps. Ctrl+F4 has been the standard for a long time now, just as Ctrl+C has meant copy. I still remember when each app used a different keystroke for Copy, and now we're backsliding on the CloseWindow command. I wonder where this misfeature started? I suspect Netscape.

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